Tibetan "Bronze Buddha"
Tibetan "Bronze Buddha"
Tibetan "Bronze Buddha"
Tibetan "Bronze Buddha"

Tibetan "Bronze Buddha"

Regular price $525.00 Sale

From: Crocker Art Museum
Limited Edition: 10
Exhibition: Buddha
Material: Printed vinyl
Dimensions: 31" x 72" (78.74cm x 182.88cm)

Hanging Hardware Included

Summary


In Tibet, the pantheon of Buddhist deities includes the five Dhyani Buddhas, "Great Buddhas of Wisdom". Each represents one human failing that must be overcome in order to achieve enlightenment: ignorance, anger, pride, attachment, and jealousy. Representing the power of the mind over jealousy is the Buddha Amoghasiddhi. 10 banners feature a 12th-century statue of Amoghasiddhi seated majestically with one hand raised in a gesture of fearlessness against evil.

Description

Vajrayana Buddhism in Tibet defines five negative traits that plague humans and keep us from attaining enlightenment. Ignorance, anger, pride, attachment, and jealousy can only be overcome by the strength of the human mind and its ability to transform these negative traits into positive attributes. These transformed emotions are embodied by five Buddhas known as the Dhyani Buddhas, “Great Buddhas of Wisdom”.

One of the Dhyani Buddhas is Amoghasiddhi, the “Almighty Conqueror”, who promotes the Buddhist path to enlightenment through the pacification of envy and jealousy. He is often depicted with a sword or thunderbolt by his side to signify his strength and ability to conquer these evils.

It is the slim, cast-bronze figure of Amoghasiddhi that is featured on this vibrant orange banner. He makes a gesture with his right hand, symbolizing fearlessness of envy and protection from jealous delusions. The image of Amoghasiddhi is that of a strong conqueror, but as with all of the Dhyani Buddhas, they represent the power of the mind as the only path to enlightenment. Yellow letters run down the left side of the banner and read simply “Buddha”. The dates of the exhibition are printed at the bottom of the banner “Jan 31 – Apr 19”. Both sides of this banner are identical.

Provenance

These banners were displayed around Sacramento, California from January 31 through April 19 to promote the exhibition, Buddha at the Crocker Art Museum.