"Hey Girl!" Scene
"Hey Girl!" Scene
"Hey Girl!" Scene
"Hey Girl!" Scene

"Hey Girl!" Scene

Regular price $549.00 Sale

From: Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago
Limited Edition: 1
Exhibition: Fear No Art
Material: Printed vinyl
Dimensions: 30" x 98" (76.2cm x 248.92000000000002cm)

Hanging Hardware Included

Summary


Romeo Castellucci is among the most exciting contemporary theatre directors. With his troupe, Societas Raffaelo Sanzio, he brings mysterious and illustrative works to the stage. The performances often have non-linear plots and strong, surreal imagery forcing the audience to feel as well as think. 4 banners from the group's Chicago run of Hey Girl! showcase his ability to accentuate and exaggerate details to great effect. While the first banner (Hey Girl! Mask) strikingly features the large, waxy face of the show's heroine, these banners feature Castellucci's dramatic and artistic mise-en-scene. A nude female figure is covered in metallic paint. She seems both soft and hard with her form becoming an organic suit of armor. The harshness of the bright figure emerging headless and faceless from the dark stage is accentuated by the sharp sword she wields. The head of the heroine lays on stage at her feet.

Description

"Hypnotically beautiful...a visual resonance that you find all too rarely on stage." - Financial Times (London)

With his latest creation Hey Girl!, Italian theater director Romeo Castellucci has created a piece that is epic in its themes and imagery. After seeing a group of girls waiting for a school bus one day, he envisioned and created the darkly poetic dreamscapes of Hey Girl!. The concept evolved to become a surreal peek into the hearts and lives of women. It explores the experience of all women who must face the world fearlessly each day, and considers archetypes from Joan of Arc to the girl next door. The piece is theater as art, a sensory journey that begins with a startling birth scene of the fully-formed heroine raring to go.

This banner features a scene from Hey Girl! that shows a dramatic, silver-painted nude figure wielding a sword. The implied strength of metallic armor is undermined by the smooth, sensuous curves of the nude female form. Faceless, she stands in shadow while the heroine’s head lies on the ground at her feet. Intense imagery and powerful symbolism are a key element of Castellucci’s production and make the work intensely gripping for the audience. The show is both reflective and direct as it lays out the nakedness and cruelty of the world in which its women move. The dark background is the stark backdrop of the stage set – there is no clutter to distract from the drama of the spectacle and no objects to aid or hinder the characters.

The other side of the banner is black with yellow and white text that reads “Fear No Art” in bold lettering and the museum’s name in white letters “Museum of Contemporary Art".

Provenance

These banners were displayed around Chicago throughout 2008 to promote the Museum of Contemporary Art's Fear No Art campaign.