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A sign of the times

A sign of the times
The French art historian, Henri Focillon, called Marie Bracquemond one of “les trois grandes dames” of Impressionism. If her name isn’t as familiar as the two others, Mary Cassatt and Berthe Morisot, it’s likely due to, er... a lack of support from her husband.

Talk about a steal

Talk about a steal
If you are interested in art or crime or the two combined the Empty Frames podcast is for you. While several books have been written on this subject, this is the first podcast that delves into the mystery of the 1990 theft of important artworks from the collection at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. 

This will make you smile, I promise!

This will make you smile, I promise!
This will make you smile, I promise!
This creative mama—who I am proud to call my friend—dressed her toddler as a Dale Chihuly sculpture last Halloween and herself as the creator himself. It's never too early get inspired and set your sights on winning the local costume contest! 

More Victorian than the Victorians, or Pretty Much Your Standard Ranch Stash

More Victorian than the Victorians, or Pretty Much Your Standard Ranch Stash
By John Norton
I have no idea what that last bit of the title means except that it's the name of a 1973 Michael Nesmith solo LP. Yes, the Monkee. I ran across this cultural artifact in the attic of my Aunt’s house and discovered that it’s not a bad country rock record— the Monkees were a talented bunch....

O for Orson

O for Orson
I've been on a movie kick, watching and rewatching films and documentaries about art. A must see is from one of my favorite people... "F for Fake" (1973) is the last major film by the man who himself became a household name through a form of deception. In this film essay/documentary Orson Welles explores the world of a master art forger.

Bauhauser Bayer and Raquel Welch

Bauhauser Bayer and Raquel Welch
I once thought it a monumental eyesore. If you have ever driven through Denver on I-25, by the Broadway exit, you may have noticed a giant yellow wall of concrete, Jenga-like blocks stacked and fanned out on top of each other. For years I eyed this sculpture with suspicion, frankly I didn't like it.