Cézanne "Man with Crossed Arms"
Cézanne "Man with Crossed Arms"
Cézanne "Man with Crossed Arms"
Cézanne "Man with Crossed Arms"

Cézanne "Man with Crossed Arms"

Regular price $685.00 Sale

From: Neue Galerie
Limited Edition: 4
Exhibition: The Ronald S. Lauder Collection: Selections from the 3rd Century BC to the 20th Century/Germany, Austria, and France
Material: Printed vinyl
Dimensions: 35" x 96" (88.9cm x 243.84cm)

Hanging Hardware Included

Summary

Cofounder of the Neue Galerie, Ronald S. Lauder, divides art into three categories: the “Oh,” the “Oh my,” and the “Oh my God.” Devotion to the latter category guided Lauder’s acquisition choices and the resulting extensive collection of OMG art. In honor of the 10th anniversary of the Neue Galerie, some 400 pieces of Lauder’s collection were crowded into seven small galleries, upending the museum’s usual focus on German and Austrian art. On public view for the first time, the Ronald S. Lauder Collection had a MoMA-like feel with van Gogh, Cézanne, Matisse and Picasso thrown in for diversity.

Description

Ronald Lauder and his friend, Serge Sabarsky, shared an appreciation for modern German and Austrian art, and they conceived of a museum that would showcase the best of this genre. Though Sabarsky died in 1996, Lauder carried out their vision and opened Neue Galerie as a tribute to his friend of 30 years.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of the museum, the exhibition, The Ronald S. Lauder Collection: Selections from the 3rd Century BC to the 20th Century/Germany, Austria, and France
Paul Cezanne’s profound influence on early 20th century painters is epitomized by Pablo Picasso’s pronouncement that Cézanne “is the father of all of us.” It is perhaps not surprising that Lauder began the exhibition with six Cézanne paintings, including Man with Crossed Arms (c. 1899) featured on this banner. The Cézanne paintings held court over an imposing display of armor and arms, as well as portraits from Germany and the Netherlands. Some of this display was said to mimic Lauder’s home library.

Man with Crossed Arms conveys an air of enigmatic contemplation. About this painting, Lauder observed, "the face is painted from five different angles, downside, upside, sideways, etc." This twist on perception was common in Cézanne’s later portraiture where he worked in relative isolation in Aix-en-Provence. His layers of paint blended restless strokes and delicate flatness causing a spatial shift between surface and depth. This painting, like the Guggenheim’s Cézanne of the same name, had an introspective, distorted quality considered a precursor to Cubism.

Man with Crossed Arms appears on both sides of the banner. At the bottom, a black band includes the exhibition’s title and date, the Neue Galerie logo and website, all in white letters. Both sides of the banner are identical.

Provenance

This banner was displayed around New York City between October 27, 2011 and April 2, 2012.