Monet "View of Amsterdam"
Monet "View of Amsterdam"
Monet "View of Amsterdam"
Monet "View of Amsterdam"

Monet "View of Amsterdam"

Regular price $525.00 Sale

From: Denver Art Museum
Limited Edition: 26
Exhibition: Inspiring Impressionism: The Impressionists and the Art of the Past
Material: Printed vinyl
Dimensions: 30" x 89" (76.2cm x 226.06cm)

Hanging Hardware Included

Summary

Claude Monet's impressionist cityscapes are among some of his most eye-catching works. During his time in Amsterdam, he painted several such views, often drawing inspiration from Dutch Baroque masters like Meindert Hobbema and Jacob van Ruisdael. Monet's 1867 work Zuiderkerk at Amsterdam is featured on 26 banners from the exhibition Inspiring Impressionism. The scene is alive with the brushstrokes and colors that are so much a part of Monet's work, but it also shows a deeper dimension to the artist's ability. The daubs of paint in the canal capture the reflection of the buildings, creating a masterpiece of light, color, and exuberant restraint.

Description

The exhibition Inspiring Impressionism: The Impressionists and the Art of the Past brought together the works of Old Masters and Impressionists to explore how the earlier works influenced those of the Impressionists. Works by 17th-century European painters were juxtaposed with later Impressionist works that they influenced. This unique display made the connections and inspirations clearly evident.

These banners feature Claude Monet's painting Zuiderkerk at Amsterdam from 1874. During his time in Amsterdam, Monet viewed and admired the work of the great Dutch Baroque painters. His view of the Zuiderkerk may well have been inspired by the landscape painter Meindert Hobbema (1638-1709), specifically his work The Haarlem Lock, Amsterdam painted c. 1664. The inspiration is seen in the wide angle of the view, and the perspective that focuses the eye to the high tower in the distance. Painting in the 17th century, Hobbema’s reflections show a vision of future modernist technique. His townscape is reflected in a loose, somewhat unstructured manner. Similarly, Monet’s reflections of the buildings are created exclusively with multicolored loose brushstrokes.

The banner features a detail of Monet’s work dramatically enlarged to cover almost the entire surface. Below the image a light blue band includes yellow and white text with the exhibition name and dates, “Inspiring Impressionism/Feb. 23 – May 25”. Both sides of the banner are identical.

Provenance

These banners were displayed around Denver, Colorado from February 23 through May 25, 2008 to promote the exhibition Inspiring Impressionism: The Impressionists and the Art of the Past at the Denver Art Museum. The exhibition was also seen at the High Museum of Art and the Seattle Art Museum.